Shakespeare club to play ‘Nothing’ with new twist

BY MEGAN RUGE – ASSISTANT LIVING AND ARTS EDITOR

The Susquehanna Shakespeare Club will perform its spring play on May 4 at 7:30 p.m. in Degenstein Theater. Admission is free, but the club would appreciate donations.

The performance will be of the famous play “Much Ado About Nothing” by William Shakespeare.

“‘Much Ado About Nothing’ is one of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies,” sophomore Michael Kennedy, a member of Shakespeare Club, said. “We are a bit low budget so the show is certain to reflect that, but our goal is to make something enjoyable.”

The club decided on the play in December and has been working on it since, striving to reach Director Michael Blaine’s vision. Blaine, who is a junior, is also the president of Shakespeare Club.

“Rehearsal usually consists of running through the scenes in order with blocking, or how to play the scene, being given to us during to make it as efficient as possible,” Kennedy said.

“Much Ado About Nothing” is usually displayed classically or given a modern spin, but Shakespeare Club has taken the show in a new direction.

The performance will incorporate small details from Star Wars. The show is on May 4, or “Star Wars Day.” The club has decided to add addtional Star Wars aspects to their performance.

“The play has a masquerade scene in which we’ll be utilizing Star Wars masks in addition to lightsabers in place of standard swords,” Kennedy said. “It’s not something we’ve done before, but we thought it would be a good time.”

People who attend the performance will experience a few other original ideas from the Shakespeare Club as far as performance etiquette.

“At every performance we give the audience baggies of Cheerio’s to throw at us as we perform if they either dislike us, like us a lot or just want to throw food at performers,” Kennedy said. This aspect is a unique trait of the Shakespeare Club performances.

The performance is not to be considered professional. The members are approachable. “The audience members are free to talk to us after the show if they’d like. We usually loiter around off the stage afterwards,” said Kennedy.

He added: “Shakespeare isn’t overtly complex or pretentious; it really is just a lot of dirty jokes.”

“The purpose of Shakespeare Club is to bring people together over a shared love of the work of William Shakespeare,” Blaine said. “We intend to keep the Bard’s works alive through sharing them with each other and the entirety of the campus.”